INTERVIEW WITH DIRECTOR

Interviewed by Leon Freebury
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1) AS THE WRITER AS WELL AS THE DIRECTOR OF BLUE ROSE, HOW DID YOU COME UP WITH THE STORY OF A LOVE CRAZED MAN GOING TO ANY MEANS POSSIBLE TO GET THE WOMAN OF HIS DREAMS?


I feel like at the core of it is something most of us can relate to, when we are in love, we can become different people, sometimes for the better, sometimes for the worse. The idea behind Blue Rose was to take that to an extreme and show how when love becomes an obsession it can be very harmful to everyone involved.



2) AS SOME MAY KNOW, BLUE ROSE ORIGINALLY DID NOT START AS THE SCRIPT IT IS NOW. HOW AND WHY DID YOU DECIDE TO TRANSITION FROM WHEN AN ANGEL FALLS FROM THE SKY?


After working on the original script for almost 6 months there was still something lacking. It took place in someone’s mind and the characters were a part of him. I was really struggling to build characters that were not too one dimensional, so I followed Ly Ann’s suggestion and went to talk to one of our lecturers who suggested I’d try to bring it to our world and then if I wanted to I could bring it back to a character’s mind. That second step never happened.



3) HOW LONG DID IT TAKE YOU OVERALL, FROM CONCEPT TO FINALISATION OF BLUE ROSE?


Well, the script took around 4 months to get from the first draft to our shooting script, the film itself is still in post-production and hopefully will be finished soon after this tough period is over.



4) WHAT WERE THE BIGGEST ROADBLOCKS THROUGHOUT THE PRODUCTION OF THE FILM?


I would say the biggest one came when we changed scripts, we had already done quite a lot of work on the older one and it was tough to change direction so suddenly. Luckily, the crew was very passionate, and that transition ended up being very positive for the film.



5) WHAT WAS THE HARDEST CHOICE YOU HAD TO MAKE DURING THE PRODUCTION OF THE FILM, ARTISTIC OR LOGISTICAL? 


On the last day of the shoot when we were filming the final scene, which was the most challenging one, we were running out of time so Kennet and I made the decision of reducing the number of shots during the dancing sequence. I still have not seen the final result, but I believe we managed to achieve what we wanted.



6) WHY DOES BLUE ROSE, MUCH LIKE YOUR OTHER FILMS, HAVE SUCH A DARK TONE? WHAT INSPIRES YOU TO TAKE THIS ROUTE WITH YOUR WRITING AND DIRECTION? 


I feel like it is just the style I enjoy working in the most. For the past few years, I have attempted slightly different genres and styles, but I have always felt more comfortable with darker stories with darker tones and with tension building being at the centre of it all.



7) WHICH FILMMAKER HAS INSPIRED YOU THE MOST? 


There are many, but I would have to say David Lynch. What he achieves with the film form is incredible, truly making everything he does a true experience.



8) HOW MUCH DID YOU STICK TO THE SCRIPT DURING SHOOTING? AS A WRITER IT MUST BE HARD TO DEVIATE FROM A SCRIPT YOU WROTE YOURSELF. 


I would say we stuck to the script quite a lot when it comes to structure and tone. I gave the actors the freedom to change or add small details that they felt fit their characters better and I was amazed by how much they brought to the film. That approach seems to have worked quite nicely as without them the film would not have translated from the page to the screen nearly as well as it did. At the end of the day what matters the most as a director is to make sure the film is as true to its core as possible, not necessarily that it is 100% like the script.



9) DO YOU WANT TO TAKE THE STORY OF BLUE ROSE ANY FURTHER?


I believe it works best as it is. It is a simple story where tension is king, and I believe keeping it short helps maintaining the atmosphere and tone throughout the film. The short format also really helped us making each scene meaningful and engaging, so I really think it was the perfect length for our story.

 

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